University of Saskatchewan Pottery - Footnotes

1“Development of Saskatchewan Resources for Saskatchewan,” Public Service Monthly, June 1920, pp. 2-3, 9.

2N.B. Davis, Report on the Clay Resources of Southern Saskatchewan (Ottawa: Government Printing Bureau, 1918).

3University of Saskatchewan Archives, Minute book of Board of Governors, University of Saskatchewan, meeting of March 22, 1921.

4W.G. Worcester, “Canada’s First Ceramic School: University of Saskatchewan,” Journal of the American Ceramic Society, vol. 6, no. 1 (January 1923), p. 108. See also ibid, p. 84, Table I, in which, no doubt at Worcester’s instance, Thorvaldson is named as the person by whose efforts the University of Saskatchewan’s program was founded.

5University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Report, 1920-21, pp. 4-5.

6“Who’s Who in the Ceramic Industry,” Clay Products News and Ceramic Record, vol. xxiv, no. 5 (May 1961), p. 25. See also University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Office fonds series I.A.107.Wo, Worcester to Murray, March 29, 1921.

7In 1924, Worcester was granted a six-month leave of absence to direct plant operations at Dominion fire Brick and Clay Products, Claybank. University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Office fonds series I.A.107Wo, W.G. Worcester to Murray, January 22, 1924, and Murray to W.G. Worcester, April 3, 1924.

8“Retired Ceramics Engineer wins Gold Medal in U.S.,” Star Phoenix (Saskatoon), June 30, 1961, p. 14.

9“Bill Phipps Retires from U. Of S.,” Clay Products News and Ceramic Record, vol. xxii, no.11 (November, 1949), p. 1, and “Prof. Worcester Pays Tribute to Bill Phipps,” Ibid., p. 13.

10University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Report, 1925-26, p. 40.

11Cameron Worcester and his wife, Rose, operated a commercial art pottery, Canadian Claycraft, in Saskatoon in the late 1930s, producing “Tee Pee Ware.” See Gail Crawford, Studio Ceramics in Canada 1920-2005 (Fredericton: Goose Lane Editions, 2005), pp. 171-72.

12Canadian Museum of Civilization, Judith Silverthorne Collection, Correspondence with James Cameron Worcester (Acc. 92-06), B.541 f.24, Worcester to Silverthorne, August 23, 1989.

13University of Saskatchewan Archives, W.G. Worcester Papers II. B), Worcester to Jack Perry, February 13, 1941.

14Ibid., Worcester to Robert I. Coleman, January 22, 1941. Saskatchewan potter Mel Bolen recalls conducting a demonstration of work on the potter’s wheel when an onlooker came forward to say that he was a ceramic engineer who had studied at the University of Saskatchewan but had never been taught to use the wheel.

15University of Saskatchewan Archives, W.G. Worcester Papers ii.a), Worcester to Helen I. Drummond, March 18, 1940.

16University of Saskatchewan Archives, W.G. Worcester Papers II.B), Worcester to Jack Perry, February 13, 1941.

17University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Report, 1937-38, p. 64.

18University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Office fonds, series I A.107Wo, W.G. Worcester to Murray, October 24, 1924.

19University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Office fonds series I.B.38/16, Report of Ceramic Department, 1933-34.

20University of Saskatchewan Archives, W.G. Worcester Papers, ii.a), E.Swain to Worcester, December 22, 1941.

21Archives of Saskatchewan, Department of Natural Resources Papers, NR 1/1, M-500-CC, Mines: Clay, Ceramics 1931-1941, W.G. Worcester to J.R. Hill, December 9, 1937.

22University of Saskatchewan Archives, W.G. Worcester Papers ii a), Aubrey T. Hall to Worcester, February 14, 1931.

23Ibid., E.A. McNab to A.J. Trotter, September 9, 1941.

24University of Saskatchewan Archives, Minute book of Ceramic Society, meeting of January 17, 1936.

25University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Office fonds series I.B.38/16, Report of Ceramic Department, 1931-32.

26Ibid., 1934-35.

27W.G. Worcester, Clay Resources of Saskatchewan (Regina: King’s Printer, 1950).

28Advertisement, Clay Product News and Ceramic Record, vol. iv, no. 1 (January 1931), p. 10. What is now known as the Claybank Brick Plant also produced bricks that were used in the facing of the Bessborough Hotel in Saskatoon, the Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City, and the Gravelbourg Cathedral. The plant ceased production in 1989 and is now a National Historic Site.

29University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Report, 1923-24, p. 4.

30University of Saskatchewan Archives, President’s Office fonds series I.B.38/16, W.G. Worcester to Murray, November 14, 1927.

31The ceramic engineering program at the University of Toronto was closed at almost the same time, and for the same principal reason: too few students. See “University of Toronto Discontinues Ceramic Engineering Course,” Clay Products News and Ceramic Record, vol. xxiv, no. 8 (August 1951), p. 1.

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